Royal Holloway, University of London
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The Developmental Studies Centre is a research facility in the Psychology Department of Royal Holloway, University of London. The DSC brings together three research groups that conduct cutting-edge research on typical and atypical development from infancy through adolescence. We have research expertise in the development of language and cognition as well as social and emotional development. We have dedicated research facilities with state-of-the-art equipment, including a baby lab, eye-tracking and ERP labs, and a video analysis suite.  
       


 
 

At the Royal Holloway Baby Lab, we study cognitive development during infancy, with a particular focus on infants’ developing mental representations of the world. We are currently conducting projects on the developing strength of object representations during infancy, and on the emergence of infants’ understanding of the nature of pictures, primarily using behavioural measures such as reaching and looking. The lab is directed by Dr Jeanne Shinskey.

   


At LiLaC, we study typical and atypical processes in language, literacy and communication.  Our studies investigate the relationships between language and literacy skill and language and social skills in children with autism and/or specific language impairment. We also use eye-tracking techniques to investigate language production, learning and understanding in real time. The lab is directed by Dr Courtenay Frazier Norbury.

 
     

 

At the Royal Holloway Social Development Lab, we study how children come to understand their everyday social experiences, as well as how they developed an understanding of key social skills that are required to navigate through their social lives. Current projects are focusing on: how race and gender may influence children’s conversations; children’s moral development; children’s understanding of self-presentation; children’s emotional understanding. The lab is directed by Dr Patrick Leman and Dr Dawn Watling. Our PhD students include Ana Macedo and Nikoleta Damaskinou.